Pirate Fishing

From what you’ve discovered in our latest post, 75% of seafood in Australia is imported. This raises questions of traceability and sustainability that is coupled with Australia’s weak labelling laws meaning we’re eating in the dark.

Right now,  we simply cannot tell if the fish we eat was legally caught because our current laws are not strong enough to trace from bait to plate.

Pirate fishing = illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing (IUU).

It is currently one of the main contributors to overfishing, unfair competition and impedes sustainable fisheries. In addition, it threatens the sustainability of our ecosystems and puts food security at risk. Although difficult to detect, current estimates suggest the losses of resources cost up to US$11-30 billion every year.

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Marine species most at risk of illegal and IUU fishing as identifying by a WWF,2005 report:

  1. Tuna 
  2. Sharks 
  3. Sea cucumber

Our oceans support the livelihoods of approximately 520 million people who rely on fishing and fishing related activities, and 2.6 billion people who depend on fish as an essential part of their diet. There is a need to move towards transparent and traceable fishing practices in order to  overcoming illegal fishing as it will positively contribute to the equitable growth and empowerment of the people who rely on fish.

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What can we do to stop pirate fishing? 

Regular surveillance, monitoring and patrols of our Australia’s maritime borders are a strong deterrent to illegal foreign fishers however,

  1. Encouraging Governments and regulators to adopt technology like AIS (Automatic Identification System) to track illegal fishing
  2. Installing on-board electronic monitoring systems in vessels which collects and shares information in real-time to provide better estimates of the catch.
  3. Encouraging consumer action to promote traceability and sustainability of the seafood supply chain. This means spreading the awareness and staying engaged: Australia Fisheries website for news of IUU 
  4. Sign our petition to help ban the super trawler which contributes to overfishing.

– A.K #error404fish

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What you need to know about wild-caught vs. farm-raised fish

What is farmed fish?  Is one source more sustainable than the other?  Does wild-caught fish mean that it’s healthier ?

We know the benefits of eating fish and now that we know that overfishing is an issue. You might wonder about sustainability and many people seem to be unsure of the differences between wild-caught and farm-raised fish.

Many people actually assume that wild-caught fish must be a lot better for you because it’s more “natural.”

Short Answer: It depends!  There are a lot of factors to consider such as nutrition, sustainability, safety and cost. And the outcome will be different depending on the species of fish, as well as where and how the fish is caught.

Organic Seafood

Image Credit:  (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

Wild-caught: caught by fisherman in their natural environment.

Farm-raised: grown in pens that are often submerged in ponds, lakes and salt water

Sustainability 

It can be a misconception that farmed-fish are more sustainable because they have been promoted by the fishing industry and governments as the solution to declining fish stocks in our ocean. However, fish-farming practices often causes a lot of pollution throughout the water and threaten existing creatures and habitats.

However, traditional fishing isn’t the solution either. Wild fish are harvested in a way that does a lot of collateral damage to the ecosystem and other fish. When fishing boats are sent out into the ocean, this isn’t very carbon-footprint friendly. Additionally, destructive fishing methods such as Super Trawlers are extremely harmful to our oceans. Sign our petition to ban them permanently in Australia. 

Find out about sustainable seafood here.

Health

Besides protein, fish are also the main source of omega-3 and low in saturated fats. The nutritional benefits between the two are not as great as you imagine.

For some species, such as the rainbow trout are almost identical in terms of calories, protein, and most nutrients.

  • Omega 3: In terms of vitamin 3, farmed fish have significantly higher levels.
  • Contaminants: From a widely cited study , they found that the levels of PCBs,  a potentially carcinogenic chemical, to be ten times higher in farmed fish than in wild-caught fish. However later studies  found that these levels are similar between the two.
  • Mercury: Levels in mercury are higher in some species of wild-caught fish such as the Bluefin Tuna. 

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Image Credit. 

A great resource you can use to search seafood recommendations is Seafood watch that will help you determine which type of seafood that’s fished or farmed in ways that have less impact on the environment.

Additionally, If you love sushi, check out our easy sustainable sushi guide! 

– A.K #Erro404fish

Sustainable Sushi 101

Every time you enter a sushi restaurant, simple ask: “Do You Serve Sustainable Seafood?”

Yes we agree, ‘sushi is love, sushi is life’ but have you ever thought about how your choice of sushi actually impacts the environment?  Now that we know some of the detrimental effects of overfishing, it’s important to re-think some of our everyday actions, such as seafood choices, in order to save the fish. 

Sustainable sushi is made from farmed or fished sources that can be maintained for future generations without jeopardising ecosystems. Unsustainable sushi can lead to concerns for the environment, economy and health.

Choosing sustainable sushi is one of the ways to stop overfishing, this choice can lead to the emergence of more sustainable sushi restaurants, responsible fisheries and stricter government regulations.

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Better Sushi choices include: 

These species are generally resilient to fishing pressure and are caught/farmed using techniques that have low environmental impacts. Some of these species may still have minor conservation concerns, but have been assessed to be a better seafood choice.

🍣  Salmon

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🍣  Mackerel

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🍣  Smelt Roe  (capelin)

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Sushi to avoid: 

Wild caught species in this group, whether Australian or imported, may be overfished or their capture heavily threatens our oceans.

🍙 Tuna (Especially Bluefin)

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🍙 Yellow Tail

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🍙  Shrimp

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🍙 Octopus

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Some sustainable sushi restaurants in Sydney include:

🎣 Fish & Co.

🎣  love.fish

🎣 Wasabi Warriors

 SIGN OUR PETITION TO BAN THE SUPER TRAWLER PERMANENTLY IN AUSTRALIA!

– A.K #error404fish 🐟

Your Oppor-Tuna-ty to Save

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Although Overfishing disrupts a vast number of different species and marine habitats, in particular tuna populations have severely declined due to overfishing and illegal overfishing. Although tuna does provide food and livelihoods for many people, they are more than just seafood. Tuna are a top predator in the marine food chain, maintaining a balance in the ocean environment.

Here’s why Tuna populations are most endangered due to overfishing:

Tuna are among the most commercially valuable fish on the planet. The Atlantic bluefin is a highly sought-after delicacy for sushi and sashimi in Asia—a single fish has sold for over $700,000! Driven by such high prices, fishermen use even more refined techniques to catch tuna. And the fish are disappearing as a result.

  1. Southern BlueFish TunaBeing one of Sydney’s most popular fish to eat, the Australian southern bluefin tuna industry is worth over $122 million annually. (2014 figure) Classified as ‘critically endangered’ on the IUCN’s Red List of threatened species means that population levels are down to around 5% of original levels, yet overfishing continues.
  2. Bigeye TunaBigeye tuna are an important commercial fish, especially prized in Asia, they are usually marketed as fresh or frozen.As bluefin tuna populations shrink around the world, pressure on bigeye fisheries is increasing.  They are also classified as ‘vulnerable’ and overfishing continues in the Eastern and Western Pacific Oceans.
  3. Yellowfin TunaAccording to the ISSF Scientific Advisory Committee, Yellowfin are overfishing and are classified as ‘nearly threatened.’ They are also increasingly susceptible to by-catch as juvenile yellowfin school with adult skipjack. They are an important commercial tuna species, particularly for the raw sashimi market.
  4. Albacore Tuna
    This species are smaller and extremely commercially important, as they are one of the two main canned tuna species (along with skipjack), and labeled as ‘solid white’ tuna. They are mainly overfished in the Northern and Southern Atlantic Oceans.

Greenpeace have a canned tuna guide that you can refer to when purchasing Tuna.

Want to help out? Sign our petition, you can also find out more about the effects of overfishing here and about sustainable seafood here.

– A.K #error404fish