Pirate Fishing

From what you’ve discovered in our latest post, 75% of seafood in Australia is imported. This raises questions of traceability and sustainability that is coupled with Australia’s weak labelling laws meaning we’re eating in the dark.

Right now,  we simply cannot tell if the fish we eat was legally caught because our current laws are not strong enough to trace from bait to plate.

Pirate fishing = illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing (IUU).

It is currently one of the main contributors to overfishing, unfair competition and impedes sustainable fisheries. In addition, it threatens the sustainability of our ecosystems and puts food security at risk. Although difficult to detect, current estimates suggest the losses of resources cost up to US$11-30 billion every year.

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Marine species most at risk of illegal and IUU fishing as identifying by a WWF,2005 report:

  1. Tuna 
  2. Sharks 
  3. Sea cucumber

Our oceans support the livelihoods of approximately 520 million people who rely on fishing and fishing related activities, and 2.6 billion people who depend on fish as an essential part of their diet. There is a need to move towards transparent and traceable fishing practices in order to  overcoming illegal fishing as it will positively contribute to the equitable growth and empowerment of the people who rely on fish.

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What can we do to stop pirate fishing? 

Regular surveillance, monitoring and patrols of our Australia’s maritime borders are a strong deterrent to illegal foreign fishers however,

  1. Encouraging Governments and regulators to adopt technology like AIS (Automatic Identification System) to track illegal fishing
  2. Installing on-board electronic monitoring systems in vessels which collects and shares information in real-time to provide better estimates of the catch.
  3. Encouraging consumer action to promote traceability and sustainability of the seafood supply chain. This means spreading the awareness and staying engaged: Australia Fisheries website for news of IUU 
  4. Sign our petition to help ban the super trawler which contributes to overfishing.

– A.K #error404fish

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Are we really eating the fish we think we’re eating?

Feature Image Credit.

As Australians, we like to think that we’re eating Australian seafood however, 75% of our seafood is currently imported, predominately from Asia. With scientists forecasting 37% rise in seafood consumption by 2050, this demand can put pressure on fisheries to overfish.

Therefore, how do we know that the fish we’re buying is sustainable? 

A key to choosing sustainable seafood is labelling. Despite some non-government and government efforts to improve this over the years, such as a mandatory requirement in 2008 to include ‘country of origin’ labelling for packaged seafood and AMCS’s Australian Fish Names Standard introduced in 2007; we still have a long way to go because it is still possible to buy fish that was caught or farmed overseas, but processed in Australia, labelled as ‘Made in Australia’.

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Australia’s weak seafood labelling laws means consumer health is at risk: high levels of mercury or other contaminants can be found in marine creatures such as fish/sharks which puts your health in danger.

What we still need on seafood labelling:

  1. Accurate names of species for imported, as well as domestic seafood.
  2. Where it was caught.
    • If caught in Australia, the individual State or Commonwealth fishery from which the fish is sourced should be provided.
    • If the fish is imported, the major fishing area as designated by the UNFAO should be identified.
  3. How it was caught: labelling for which type of fishing gear or aquaculture method used.
  4. The name of the company that caught or farmed the seafood.

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The Australian Federal Government is needed now more than ever to impose stricter regulations on labelling and traceability. All fishing has an impact but some methods are more harmful than others. This means that if we knew how our fish was caught/farmed, we could avoid choosing seafood that was taken or produced by more damaging methods such as super trawling. 

Help stop overfishing by banning the super trawler in Australia permanently by signing our petition.

Also improve labelling by joining the Labelmyfish campaign.

– A.K #Error404fish